Effects of changing light conditions on the ecophysiological condition behind survival were examined on beech from two different populations. Plants were grown in a greenhouse under simulated understorey and canopy gap light conditions. Upon exposure to high light maximum photosynthesis of shade-acclimated leaves increased followed by a reduction over several days to between high- and low-light control rates. In the reciprocal transfer, the decrease in maximum photosynthesis was rapid during the first 2–3 days and then levelled off to values comparable to low-light controls. Seedlings from Sicily (Madonie) showed generally higher maximum photosynthetic rates than those from Abetone. Leaf conductance varied in the same direction as photosynthesis in high- to low-light seedlings but to a lesser degree. Leaves grown under low light and exposed to high light experienced photoinhibition. The Abetone population was more susceptible to photoinhibitory damage than the seedlings from Sicily. Exposure to high light of shade-acclimated seedlings resulted in intermediate chlorophyll concentrations between levels of the high-light and low-light seedlings. Carotenoid concentration was unaffected by treatments. Seedlings grew more in high light, but had a lower leaf area ratio. Light-limited seedlings showed a shift in carbon allocation to foliage. Leaves formed in the new light regime maintained the same anatomy that had been developed before transfer. Seedlings from Sicily had thicker leaves than those of seedlings from Abetone. Seedlings from Abetone were found to be more susceptible to changing light conditions than seedlings from Sicily. We conclude that small forest gaps may represent a favorable environment for photosynthesis and growth of beech regeneration as a result of the limited ability of seedlings to acclimate to sudden increases in high irradiance and because of the moderate levels of light stress in small gaps.

Acclimation to changing light conditions of long-term shade-grown beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings of different geographic origins

BORGHETTI, Marco
1998

Abstract

Effects of changing light conditions on the ecophysiological condition behind survival were examined on beech from two different populations. Plants were grown in a greenhouse under simulated understorey and canopy gap light conditions. Upon exposure to high light maximum photosynthesis of shade-acclimated leaves increased followed by a reduction over several days to between high- and low-light control rates. In the reciprocal transfer, the decrease in maximum photosynthesis was rapid during the first 2–3 days and then levelled off to values comparable to low-light controls. Seedlings from Sicily (Madonie) showed generally higher maximum photosynthetic rates than those from Abetone. Leaf conductance varied in the same direction as photosynthesis in high- to low-light seedlings but to a lesser degree. Leaves grown under low light and exposed to high light experienced photoinhibition. The Abetone population was more susceptible to photoinhibitory damage than the seedlings from Sicily. Exposure to high light of shade-acclimated seedlings resulted in intermediate chlorophyll concentrations between levels of the high-light and low-light seedlings. Carotenoid concentration was unaffected by treatments. Seedlings grew more in high light, but had a lower leaf area ratio. Light-limited seedlings showed a shift in carbon allocation to foliage. Leaves formed in the new light regime maintained the same anatomy that had been developed before transfer. Seedlings from Sicily had thicker leaves than those of seedlings from Abetone. Seedlings from Abetone were found to be more susceptible to changing light conditions than seedlings from Sicily. We conclude that small forest gaps may represent a favorable environment for photosynthesis and growth of beech regeneration as a result of the limited ability of seedlings to acclimate to sudden increases in high irradiance and because of the moderate levels of light stress in small gaps.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11563/622
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