The Lower Palaeolithic site of Cimitero di Atella is located in the Basilicata region Southern Italy), about 10 km south of the extinct Monte Vulture volcano. The site was discovered in the early 1990s and was continuously excavated for nearly twenty years under the supervision of Professor E. Borzatti von Lowenstern ¨ (University of Florence). This open-air site contained a 5-m-thick fluvio-lacustrine sequence characterized by the occurrence of two main archaeological units with lithic industries and faunal remains. Based on the composition of the lithic assemblages, and in particular the presence of handaxes in the Lower unit, Borzatti von Lowenstern ¨ (et al., 1997) attributed the site to the Early Acheulean. Cimitero di Atella was interpreted as the result of various lake shore occupations linked to the exploitation of large mammals (Palaeoloxodon antiquus and Bison sp.) and the oppor tunistic use of raw materials to produce simple small and large lithic tools (Borzatti von Lowenstern ¨ et al., 1997). The purpose of this paper is to present the last five years of research at the site. Geochronological, palae ontological and palynological investigations have been conducted to shed light on the environmental and chronological context of the site and the associated human occupations levels. This essential step enables us to evaluate the nature and potential of archaeological data in order to place the results in a broader framework. The accurate study of the context and of the archaeological material of Cimitero di Atella enable us to rethink the crucial question of the emergence of the bifacial phenomenon in Europe.

Multidisciplinary study of the Lower Palaeolithic site of Cimitero di Atella (Basilicata), Italy.

Paolo Giannandrea;Marcello Schiattarella;
2023-01-01

Abstract

The Lower Palaeolithic site of Cimitero di Atella is located in the Basilicata region Southern Italy), about 10 km south of the extinct Monte Vulture volcano. The site was discovered in the early 1990s and was continuously excavated for nearly twenty years under the supervision of Professor E. Borzatti von Lowenstern ¨ (University of Florence). This open-air site contained a 5-m-thick fluvio-lacustrine sequence characterized by the occurrence of two main archaeological units with lithic industries and faunal remains. Based on the composition of the lithic assemblages, and in particular the presence of handaxes in the Lower unit, Borzatti von Lowenstern ¨ (et al., 1997) attributed the site to the Early Acheulean. Cimitero di Atella was interpreted as the result of various lake shore occupations linked to the exploitation of large mammals (Palaeoloxodon antiquus and Bison sp.) and the oppor tunistic use of raw materials to produce simple small and large lithic tools (Borzatti von Lowenstern ¨ et al., 1997). The purpose of this paper is to present the last five years of research at the site. Geochronological, palae ontological and palynological investigations have been conducted to shed light on the environmental and chronological context of the site and the associated human occupations levels. This essential step enables us to evaluate the nature and potential of archaeological data in order to place the results in a broader framework. The accurate study of the context and of the archaeological material of Cimitero di Atella enable us to rethink the crucial question of the emergence of the bifacial phenomenon in Europe.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11563/174496
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