Water scarcity is of growing concern in many countries around the world, especially within the arid and semi-arid zones. Accordingly, rationalizing irrigation water has become an obligation to achieve the sustainable developmental goals of these countries. This may take place via using deficit irrigation which is long thought to be an effective strategy to save and improve water productivity. The current study is a trial to evaluate the pros and cons of using 50 and 75 % of the irrigation requirements (IR) of wheat (deficit irrigations) versus 100 %IR, while precisely charting changes in wheat growth parameters, antioxidant enzymes in plant shoots and the overall nutritional status of plants (NPK contents). Accordingly, a field experiment was conducted for two successive seasons, followed a split-plot design in which deficit irrigations (two irrigations to achieve 50 % of the irrigations requirements (IR), three irrigations to attain 75 % IR, and four irrigations to fulfill 100 % IR) were placed in main plots while four different studied wheat cultivars were in subplots. Results obtained herein indicate that deficit irrigations led to significant reductions in growth parameters and productivity of all wheat cultivars, especially when using 50 % IR. It also decreased NPK contents within plant shoots while elevated their contents of proline, peroxidase, and catalase enzymes. On the other hand, this type of irrigation decreased virtual water content (VWC, the amount of water used in production on ton of wheat grains). Stress tolerance index (STI), and financial revenues per unit area were also assessed. The obtained values of grain productivity, STI, VWC and financial revenues were weighted via PCA analyses, and then introduced in a novel model to estimate the efficiency of deficit irrigations (ODEI) whose results specified that the overall efficiency decreased as follows: 50 %IR < 75 %IR < 100 %IR. In conclusion, deficit irrigation is not deemed appropriate for rationalizing irrigation water while growing wheat on arid soils.

Can deficit irrigations be an optimum solution for increasing water productivity under arid conditions? A case study on wheat plants

Scopa, Antonio
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Water scarcity is of growing concern in many countries around the world, especially within the arid and semi-arid zones. Accordingly, rationalizing irrigation water has become an obligation to achieve the sustainable developmental goals of these countries. This may take place via using deficit irrigation which is long thought to be an effective strategy to save and improve water productivity. The current study is a trial to evaluate the pros and cons of using 50 and 75 % of the irrigation requirements (IR) of wheat (deficit irrigations) versus 100 %IR, while precisely charting changes in wheat growth parameters, antioxidant enzymes in plant shoots and the overall nutritional status of plants (NPK contents). Accordingly, a field experiment was conducted for two successive seasons, followed a split-plot design in which deficit irrigations (two irrigations to achieve 50 % of the irrigations requirements (IR), three irrigations to attain 75 % IR, and four irrigations to fulfill 100 % IR) were placed in main plots while four different studied wheat cultivars were in subplots. Results obtained herein indicate that deficit irrigations led to significant reductions in growth parameters and productivity of all wheat cultivars, especially when using 50 % IR. It also decreased NPK contents within plant shoots while elevated their contents of proline, peroxidase, and catalase enzymes. On the other hand, this type of irrigation decreased virtual water content (VWC, the amount of water used in production on ton of wheat grains). Stress tolerance index (STI), and financial revenues per unit area were also assessed. The obtained values of grain productivity, STI, VWC and financial revenues were weighted via PCA analyses, and then introduced in a novel model to estimate the efficiency of deficit irrigations (ODEI) whose results specified that the overall efficiency decreased as follows: 50 %IR < 75 %IR < 100 %IR. In conclusion, deficit irrigation is not deemed appropriate for rationalizing irrigation water while growing wheat on arid soils.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11563/162649
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