While biochar enhanced carbon sequestration and stability of soil organic matter (SOM), changes in organic molecular composition in biochar-amended soils had been poorly addressed. In this study, molecular composition changes of a paddy topsoil 2 years following amendments at 10 t ha−1 OC equivalent with untreated (CS), manured (CM) and charred (CB) maize straw were compared to no amendment (CK). Topsoil SOM was sequentially extracted with ultrapure water (UWE), solvent (TSE), base hydrolysis (BHY) and CuO oxidation (CUO) and molecular compounds in these extracted fractions were detected quantitatively by GC/MS. Compared to CK, SOC content was increased respectively by 12% under CS and CM, and by 36% under CB. Fraction abundance both of UWE and CUO was increased but that of TSE unchanged under CS and CM, while that of BHY unchanged under CS but increased by > 60% under CM and CB, respectively. Under CB relative to CS and CM, abundance of TSE and BHY fractions was greatly increased but that of UWE and CUO unchanged. Specifically, abundances of water-soluble monosaccharides, low molecular weight organic acids and lignin-derived phenols, especially cinnamyl-based monomers, were all enhanced under CS, but abundances of n-alkanols, fatty acids in free lipids and di-acids and hydroxyl fatty acids in bound lipids were decreased under both CS and CM. In contrast, CB amendment increased abundances of n-alkanols, alkanes and sterols in free lipids while enhanced molecular and functional group diversity of UWE and TSE fractions. Overall, short-term crop residue amendment altered the abundance and molecular diversity of OM mainly associated with short-lived UWE and labile TSE fractions and biochar enhanced preservation of plant derived molecules mainly in lipids. Thus, returning crop residue as biochar could be a sustainable approach to enhance not only SOM pool but molecular diversity also in agricultural soils.

Amendment of straw biochar increased molecular diversity and enhanced preservation of plant derived organic matter in extracted fractions of a rice paddy

Drosos M.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

While biochar enhanced carbon sequestration and stability of soil organic matter (SOM), changes in organic molecular composition in biochar-amended soils had been poorly addressed. In this study, molecular composition changes of a paddy topsoil 2 years following amendments at 10 t ha−1 OC equivalent with untreated (CS), manured (CM) and charred (CB) maize straw were compared to no amendment (CK). Topsoil SOM was sequentially extracted with ultrapure water (UWE), solvent (TSE), base hydrolysis (BHY) and CuO oxidation (CUO) and molecular compounds in these extracted fractions were detected quantitatively by GC/MS. Compared to CK, SOC content was increased respectively by 12% under CS and CM, and by 36% under CB. Fraction abundance both of UWE and CUO was increased but that of TSE unchanged under CS and CM, while that of BHY unchanged under CS but increased by > 60% under CM and CB, respectively. Under CB relative to CS and CM, abundance of TSE and BHY fractions was greatly increased but that of UWE and CUO unchanged. Specifically, abundances of water-soluble monosaccharides, low molecular weight organic acids and lignin-derived phenols, especially cinnamyl-based monomers, were all enhanced under CS, but abundances of n-alkanols, fatty acids in free lipids and di-acids and hydroxyl fatty acids in bound lipids were decreased under both CS and CM. In contrast, CB amendment increased abundances of n-alkanols, alkanes and sterols in free lipids while enhanced molecular and functional group diversity of UWE and TSE fractions. Overall, short-term crop residue amendment altered the abundance and molecular diversity of OM mainly associated with short-lived UWE and labile TSE fractions and biochar enhanced preservation of plant derived molecules mainly in lipids. Thus, returning crop residue as biochar could be a sustainable approach to enhance not only SOM pool but molecular diversity also in agricultural soils.
2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11563/160906
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