The production of ginseng, an important Chinese medicine crop, has been increasingly challenged by soil degradation and pathogenic disease under continuous cropping in Northeast China. In a field experiment, an Alfisol garden continuously cropped with Chinese ginseng (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer) was treated with soil amendment at 20 t ha-1 with maize (MB) and wood (WB) biochar, respectively, compared to conventional manure compost (MC). Two years after the amendment, the rooted topsoil and ginseng plants were sampled. The changes in soil fertility and health, particularly in the soil microbial community and root disease incidence, and in ginseng growth and quality were portrayed using soil physico-chemical assays, biochemical assays of extracellular enzyme activities and gene sequencing assays as well as ginsenoside assays. Topsoil fertility was improved by 23% and 39%, ginseng root biomass increased by 25% and 27%, and root quality improved by 6% and 18% with WB and MB, respectively, compared to MC. In the ginseng rhizosphere, fungal abundance increased by 96% and 384%, with a significant and insignificant increase in bacterial abundance, respectively, under WB and MB. Specifically, the abundance of Fusarium spp. was significantly reduced by 19-35%, while that of Burkholderia spp. increased by folds under biochar amendments over MC. Relevantly, there was a significant decrease in the abundance proportion of pathotrophic fungi but a great increase in that of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, along with an enhanced microbial community network complexity, especially fungal community complexity, under biochar amendments. Thus, biochar, particularly from maize residue, could promote ginseng quality production while enhancing soil health and ecological services, including carbon sequestration, in continuously cropped fields.

Improved ginseng production under continuous cropping through soil health reinforcement and rhizosphere microbial manipulation with biochar: a field study of Panax ginseng from Northeast China

Drosos M.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

The production of ginseng, an important Chinese medicine crop, has been increasingly challenged by soil degradation and pathogenic disease under continuous cropping in Northeast China. In a field experiment, an Alfisol garden continuously cropped with Chinese ginseng (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer) was treated with soil amendment at 20 t ha-1 with maize (MB) and wood (WB) biochar, respectively, compared to conventional manure compost (MC). Two years after the amendment, the rooted topsoil and ginseng plants were sampled. The changes in soil fertility and health, particularly in the soil microbial community and root disease incidence, and in ginseng growth and quality were portrayed using soil physico-chemical assays, biochemical assays of extracellular enzyme activities and gene sequencing assays as well as ginsenoside assays. Topsoil fertility was improved by 23% and 39%, ginseng root biomass increased by 25% and 27%, and root quality improved by 6% and 18% with WB and MB, respectively, compared to MC. In the ginseng rhizosphere, fungal abundance increased by 96% and 384%, with a significant and insignificant increase in bacterial abundance, respectively, under WB and MB. Specifically, the abundance of Fusarium spp. was significantly reduced by 19-35%, while that of Burkholderia spp. increased by folds under biochar amendments over MC. Relevantly, there was a significant decrease in the abundance proportion of pathotrophic fungi but a great increase in that of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, along with an enhanced microbial community network complexity, especially fungal community complexity, under biochar amendments. Thus, biochar, particularly from maize residue, could promote ginseng quality production while enhancing soil health and ecological services, including carbon sequestration, in continuously cropped fields.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11563/160874
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