Soil hydraulic and hydrodispersive properties are necessary for modeling water and solute fluxes in agricultural and environmental systems. Despite the major efforts in developing methods (e.g., laboratory-based, pedotransfer functions), their characterization at applicative scales remains an imperative requirement. Accordingly, this paper proposes a noninvasive in situ method integrating electromagnetic induction (EMI) and hydrological modeling to estimate soil hydraulic and transport properties at the plot scale. To this end, we carried out two sequential water infiltration and solute transport experiments and conducted time-lapse EMI surveys using a CMD Mini-Explorer to examine how well this methodology can be used to (i) monitor water content dynamic after irrigation and to estimate the soil hydraulic van Genuchten-Mualem parameters from the water infiltration experiment as well as (ii) to monitor solute concentration and to estimate solute dispersivity from the solute transport experiment. We then compared the results with those estimated by direct time domain reflectometry (TDR) and tensiometer probe measurements. The EMI significantly underestimated the water content distribution observed by TDR, but the water content evolved similarly over time. This introduced two main effects on soil hydraulic properties obtained by the two methods: (i) similar water retention curve shapes, but underestimated saturated water content from the EMI method, resulting in a scaled water retention curve when compared with the TDR method; the EMI-based water retention curve can be scaled by measuring the actual saturated water content at the end of the experiment with TDR probes or by weighing soil samples; (ii) almost overlapping hydraulic conductivity curves, as expected when considering that the shape of the hydraulic conductivity curve primarily reflects changes in water content over time. Nevertheless, EMI-based estimations of soil hydraulic properties and transport properties were found to be fairly accurate in comparison with those obtained from direct TDR measurements and tensiometer probe measurements.

In situ estimation of soil hydraulic and hydrodispersive properties by inversion of electromagnetic induction measurements and soil hydrological modeling

Dragonetti, G;Basile, A;Coppola, A
Conceptualization
2022-01-01

Abstract

Soil hydraulic and hydrodispersive properties are necessary for modeling water and solute fluxes in agricultural and environmental systems. Despite the major efforts in developing methods (e.g., laboratory-based, pedotransfer functions), their characterization at applicative scales remains an imperative requirement. Accordingly, this paper proposes a noninvasive in situ method integrating electromagnetic induction (EMI) and hydrological modeling to estimate soil hydraulic and transport properties at the plot scale. To this end, we carried out two sequential water infiltration and solute transport experiments and conducted time-lapse EMI surveys using a CMD Mini-Explorer to examine how well this methodology can be used to (i) monitor water content dynamic after irrigation and to estimate the soil hydraulic van Genuchten-Mualem parameters from the water infiltration experiment as well as (ii) to monitor solute concentration and to estimate solute dispersivity from the solute transport experiment. We then compared the results with those estimated by direct time domain reflectometry (TDR) and tensiometer probe measurements. The EMI significantly underestimated the water content distribution observed by TDR, but the water content evolved similarly over time. This introduced two main effects on soil hydraulic properties obtained by the two methods: (i) similar water retention curve shapes, but underestimated saturated water content from the EMI method, resulting in a scaled water retention curve when compared with the TDR method; the EMI-based water retention curve can be scaled by measuring the actual saturated water content at the end of the experiment with TDR probes or by weighing soil samples; (ii) almost overlapping hydraulic conductivity curves, as expected when considering that the shape of the hydraulic conductivity curve primarily reflects changes in water content over time. Nevertheless, EMI-based estimations of soil hydraulic properties and transport properties were found to be fairly accurate in comparison with those obtained from direct TDR measurements and tensiometer probe measurements.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11563/160206
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