People are facing uncertain and difficult times in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic. If many of us have to self-isolate in urban or suburban environments, we need something to do to keep our bodies and minds active and fed. In such a challenging scenario, a garden in urban spaces can bring recreational, health, economic and environmental benefits. Regardless of the Covid-19 pandemic, there is untapped potential for this kind of garden to impact environmental outcomes, public awareness, and market trends. Urban vegetable gardens could provide a small-scale approach to the sustainable use of natural resources, leading towards self-sufficiency, self-regulation, sustainability, and environmental protection. Here I present a work on my experience, focusing on the benefits of plants (psychological, health, economic, productive) in this k of better work than setting up a home vegetable garden. I know that the idea seems, at a first glance, strange and inappropriate - considering the number of current and future problems - but, as a scientist, I felt I had to do it. A vegetable garden in home spaces can provide recreation, enhance physical and mental health, and provide economic and environmental benefits. There are no greenhouse gas emissions, no use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, no leaching losses. Regardless of practical challenges and the existential difficulties we face, there is untapped potential for It is time to think about a new way of living that starts from daily activities, with a small-scale and bottomup approach, based on sustainable use of natural resources and promotion of a subsistence economy and bartering, aimed at lasting well-being in generations both in material terms (food and energy) and psychological terms, able to integrate various disciplines (such as agriculture and animal husbandry, forestry, biology, architecture, engineering, but also economics, sociology, philosophy, and psychology). Covid-19 could be one the last warning that gives us time to reconsider human behavior - from global warming to the ever-increasing intensity and speed of activities, all of which are related to the principle of the capitalistic system. This pause can help us deliberate how all this can be transformed into a sustainable system; maybe it can be considered as a big chance.

Converting urban spaces into food gardens during the Covid-19 pandemic

Sofo A
2021

Abstract

People are facing uncertain and difficult times in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic. If many of us have to self-isolate in urban or suburban environments, we need something to do to keep our bodies and minds active and fed. In such a challenging scenario, a garden in urban spaces can bring recreational, health, economic and environmental benefits. Regardless of the Covid-19 pandemic, there is untapped potential for this kind of garden to impact environmental outcomes, public awareness, and market trends. Urban vegetable gardens could provide a small-scale approach to the sustainable use of natural resources, leading towards self-sufficiency, self-regulation, sustainability, and environmental protection. Here I present a work on my experience, focusing on the benefits of plants (psychological, health, economic, productive) in this k of better work than setting up a home vegetable garden. I know that the idea seems, at a first glance, strange and inappropriate - considering the number of current and future problems - but, as a scientist, I felt I had to do it. A vegetable garden in home spaces can provide recreation, enhance physical and mental health, and provide economic and environmental benefits. There are no greenhouse gas emissions, no use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, no leaching losses. Regardless of practical challenges and the existential difficulties we face, there is untapped potential for It is time to think about a new way of living that starts from daily activities, with a small-scale and bottomup approach, based on sustainable use of natural resources and promotion of a subsistence economy and bartering, aimed at lasting well-being in generations both in material terms (food and energy) and psychological terms, able to integrate various disciplines (such as agriculture and animal husbandry, forestry, biology, architecture, engineering, but also economics, sociology, philosophy, and psychology). Covid-19 could be one the last warning that gives us time to reconsider human behavior - from global warming to the ever-increasing intensity and speed of activities, all of which are related to the principle of the capitalistic system. This pause can help us deliberate how all this can be transformed into a sustainable system; maybe it can be considered as a big chance.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11563/152516
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