The aim of this investigation was to determine if a temperature response curve can be used to describe sunburn in grape berries. Trials were carried out at the Viticulture and Enology Department (University of California, Davis) on cv Chardonnay (clone 29) grown under both field and greenhouse conditions. Greenhouse plants were two years old, grown in 5 L pots, and watered daily with a modified Hoagland’s nutrient solution. The vines were pruned to two shoots with one or two clusters per shoot, and the shoots were vertically trained to approximately 1.5 m. Field-grown vines were clone 29 grafted onto 101-14 rootstock, planted at 2.5 x 3.7 m spacing, cane pruned, and VSP trained. Rows were north-south oriented. In order to increase the temperature of the berry surface, solar radiation was concentrated using a normal reading lens with different magnifications degrees. Temperature was measured with a copper-constantan thermocouples attached to the berry surface. Experiments were performed just before harvest. Sunburn was caused by using different ranges of temperatures held constant for 2 or 5 minutes in the case of greenhouse plants and 5, 10, and 15 minutes in the case of field-grown plants. The effects of treatments were rated on visual basis by a panel of 3 people at one day intervals for three or four consecutive days after the treatments. On the last day, treated berries were harvested and analyzed for cell viability and membrane integrity using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) technique. In greenhouse grown vines, a temperature of 38-40 °C for 5 minutes was sufficient to cause visual symptoms of sunburn two days after the treatments, even if no cells were permanently damaged. In field-grown vines, 5 minutes at 40-43 °C caused 12.4% cell mortality and permanent surface deformation. In conclusion, exposure of berries to a surface temperature of 40-43 °C appears to be effective in causing sunburn in greenhouse and field-grown plants. The radiation regime experienced by the cluster during the growing season may be important to determine the critical level of temperature causing sunburn.

Preliminary investigations on sunburn in Chardonnay grapevine variety

NUZZO, Vitale;
2009

Abstract

The aim of this investigation was to determine if a temperature response curve can be used to describe sunburn in grape berries. Trials were carried out at the Viticulture and Enology Department (University of California, Davis) on cv Chardonnay (clone 29) grown under both field and greenhouse conditions. Greenhouse plants were two years old, grown in 5 L pots, and watered daily with a modified Hoagland’s nutrient solution. The vines were pruned to two shoots with one or two clusters per shoot, and the shoots were vertically trained to approximately 1.5 m. Field-grown vines were clone 29 grafted onto 101-14 rootstock, planted at 2.5 x 3.7 m spacing, cane pruned, and VSP trained. Rows were north-south oriented. In order to increase the temperature of the berry surface, solar radiation was concentrated using a normal reading lens with different magnifications degrees. Temperature was measured with a copper-constantan thermocouples attached to the berry surface. Experiments were performed just before harvest. Sunburn was caused by using different ranges of temperatures held constant for 2 or 5 minutes in the case of greenhouse plants and 5, 10, and 15 minutes in the case of field-grown plants. The effects of treatments were rated on visual basis by a panel of 3 people at one day intervals for three or four consecutive days after the treatments. On the last day, treated berries were harvested and analyzed for cell viability and membrane integrity using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) technique. In greenhouse grown vines, a temperature of 38-40 °C for 5 minutes was sufficient to cause visual symptoms of sunburn two days after the treatments, even if no cells were permanently damaged. In field-grown vines, 5 minutes at 40-43 °C caused 12.4% cell mortality and permanent surface deformation. In conclusion, exposure of berries to a surface temperature of 40-43 °C appears to be effective in causing sunburn in greenhouse and field-grown plants. The radiation regime experienced by the cluster during the growing season may be important to determine the critical level of temperature causing sunburn.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11563/13127
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